Survival Guide Bookstore

amazonsmall   

Welcome to the Software Project Survival Bookstore, brought to you in association with
Amazon.com. This bookstore offers the books described in SPSG at 20-30% off list price. You can also buy most of these books from other recommended bookstores.

See Steve's recommended reading lists for more recommendations.


 book headers    

Steve McConnell. Software Project Survival Guide. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press, 1997. This is the book that's related to the Survival Guide Website. Read excerpts from SPSG.

Read more about it, or buy the book


Recommended
Approach to
Software
Development, Revision 3
   Recommended Approach to Software Development, Revision 3, Document SEL-81-305, Greenbelt, Maryland: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, 1992.  The Software Engineering Laboratory’s Recommended Approach is probably the most practical overview of running a software project that I have read. It is intended for use specifically with flight dynamics projects, but many of its recommendations are much more broadly applicable. The book projects the heartening message that software projects are not mysterious, hard-to-control entities. They are extremely complex entities, but they can be controlled through diligent application of lessons learned from previous projects.

Obtain a single copy for free by writing to Software Engineering Branch, Code 552, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, or download the Recommended Approach to Software Development document.

Recommended Approach to
Software
Development,
Revision 3
   Manager’s Handbook for Software Development, Revision 1, Document SEL-84-101, Greenbelt, Maryland: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, 1990.  The SEL’s Manager’s Handbook is almost as useful as the Recommended Approach. It is shorter, and the guidelines it presents are focused specifically on software project management topics. You can order it or download it in the same way as you can the Recommended Approach. You can obtain a single copy for free by writing to Software Engineering Branch, Code 552, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771.

Obtain a single copy for free by writing to Software Engineering Branch, Code 552, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771, or download the Manager’s Handbook for Software Development, Revision 1 document.

 201princ    

Alan M. Davis. 201 Principles of Software Development, New York: McGraw-Hill, 1995. 201 Principles provides an easy-to-read introduction to the critical issues in software development. Davis’s book prepares you to recognize key issues when other books discuss them and when they crop up on your own projects.

Read more about it, or buy the book


 peopleware    

Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister. Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams. New York: Dorset House, 1987. Peopleware drives home the message that programming is first and foremost something done by people and only secondarily something that happens to involve computers. It’s entertaining reading, providing memorable stories about software teams that worked and teams that didn’t.

Read more about it, or buy the book


 tomgilb    

Tom Gilb. Principles of Software Engineering Management. Wokingham, England: Addison-Wesley, 1988. Gilb’s book puts the "engineering" into software engineering management by taking a quantitative, risk-oriented approach to conducting a software project. It is based on Gilb’s considerable experience as an internationally renowned software project management consultant. This is not the book to read to learn the conventional wisdom about software project success—it takes its own path too often for that. But I think that in the vast majority of cases in which it doesn’t follow the conventional wisdom, it is because Gilb is right and the conventional wisdom is wrong.

Read more about it, or buy the book


 Rapid Development    

Steve McConnell. Rapid Development. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press, 1996. If you’ve liked SPSG, you will probably also like what I have to say in Rapid Development. It contains general, but still practical, discussions of classic mistakes, risk management, lifecycle planning, scheduling, motivation, teamwork, and many other topics related to rapid software development. Read excerpts from Rapid Development.

Read more about it, or buy the book


 successfulprojects    

Fergus O’Connell. How to Run Successful Projects II: The Silver Bullet. London: Prentice Hall International (UK) Limited, 1996. O’Connell’s book provides a well-written, end-to-end examination of what is needed to run a successful software project. It covers the same ground as SPSG and is quite compatible with it, but there is surprisingly little overlap. Whereas this book provides a big picture technical framework for a project, O’Connell’s book focuses on the many specific activities a project manager must perform. It includes many example project forms and planning materials. If, in reading SPSG you’ve asked yourself, "This all sounds good, but what do I do?" then O’Connell’s book is the right book for you.

Read more about it, or buy the book


 industrial    

Lawrence H. Putnam and Ware Myers. Industrial Strength Software: Effective Management Using Measurement, Washington: IEEE Computer Society Press, 1997. Putnam and Myers have created an excellent reference that describes how to use software measurement to manage all aspects of software development. In contrast to Gilb’s book, Putnam and Myers’s book focuses less on specific projects and more on organizational capability. Chapter 21, "Shining Shadow Loses its Luster," is a special gem—dramatically illustrating the power of quantitative approaches to software project management.

Read more about it, or buy the book


 Code Complete1    

Steve McConnell. Code Complete. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press, 1993. My first book is an exhaustive compendium of all the detailed software-construction level practices that make the difference between readable, maintainable, extendible programs and disorganized mish-mashes that become unworkable after initial construction. Read excerpts from Code Complete.

Read more about it, or buy the book